A National Securities Arbitration & Investment Fraud Law Firm

FacebookTwitterLinkedInJustiaFeed

Articles Posted in FINRA Investor Alert

Published on:

Investment Center Broker Accused of Stealing $300K from Elderly Client on silverlaw.comLeon Vaccarelli allegedly defrauded a total of nine clients out of more than $1 million

In May, former financial advisor Leon Vaccarelli was charged with 12 counts of fraud and money laundering in a federal court in Connecticut. If convicted on all of them, he could receive a maximum penalty of 210 years in prison. After pleading not guilty, Vaccarelli was released on a $100,000 bond.

Vaccarelli is alleged to have stolen money from several clients between 2011 and 2017. During that time, he reportedly informed his clients that their money would be invested in different places, including money market accounts and retirement products. What Vaccarelli actually did, according to investigators, was put the money into his own account and use it to pay his own expenses. In addition, federal prosecutors also say that he also used client money to make interest payments to other investors.

Published on:

National Securities Corporation: Frequent Customer Disputes with FINRA on silverlaw.comHow the company has violated or been accused of violating FINRA regulations

It is always important for investors to have a good understanding of the financial professionals they work with. Before handing over money to anyone, brokers should be vetted properly. This is why the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) created its BrokerCheck reports.

Not only do these provide good information on where brokers are licensed and their work histories, but they also reveal customer disputes, discharges, and alleged improper activity. But these reports don’t just cover brokers – they also include their member firms.

Published on:

Some of National Securities Corporation’s FINRA-Reported Brokers on silverlaw.comThese four brokers have been accused of numerous infractions

National Securities Corporation has been operating for decades and has offices and brokers all over the U.S. Unfortunately, however, a significant percentage of their brokers have been involved in numerous customer complaints. Here are just a few examples of how National Securities employees have allegedly violated FINRA rules:

James Eichner

Published on:

Senior Citizens in Florida Reportedly Scammed into Investing in Fake Fish Farm on silverlaw.comSeveral older investors reportedly fell victim to the scam, including a former police officer

From 2013 to 2014, several senior citizens living in South Florida invested over $400,000 in Blue Ocean Farm, a fish farm company. Three purported financial professionals reportedly solicited funds for the farm – Rebecca Gonzalez and Matthew Braun of Boca Raton and Michael Creamer of St. Petersburg. There was just one problem: the Florida Department of Law Enforcement says that the company was completely bogus.

The scheme was allegedly spearheaded by Gonzalez, and now she, Braun, and Creamer are facing several charges, including fraud, selling unregistered securities, and the sale of securities by an unregistered person. The trio reportedly targeted six older investors, all of which handed over thousands of dollars.

Published on:

Securities Arbitration Claims Against National Securities Corp. on silverlaw.comAccording to some reports, nearly 1/3 of National Securities brokers have had regulatory issues, legal disputes, or personal financial problems that have been disclosed to investors

National Securities Corporation is one of the oldest financial firms in the U.S., dating back over 70 years. Its the main office is in Seattle, Washington, but the company has licenses to operate in every state in the country, as well as the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

National Securities Corporation is registered with the SEC and three self-regulatory organizations: Nasdaq, Cboe BZX Exchanged, Inc., and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) – and it is with the latter agency that the company has come under intense scrutiny over the last couple of decades.

Published on:

SEC Charges Texas Pastor and Former Louisiana Broker with Money Laundering and Wire Fraud on silverlaw.comThe elder financial fraud allegations reportedly cost elderly investors over $1M of retirement savings

Once a prominent Methodist pastor in Houston, Texas, Kirbyjon Caldwell is now charged by the SEC with numerous counts of money laundering and wire fraud. The charges are directly related to a scheme Caldwell and his partner, Gregory Alan Smith – a self-proclaimed financial advisor who was also charged – allegedly used to defraud elderly investors by selling them an interest in defunct, pre-Revolutionary Chinese bonds.

It is alleged that in 2013 and 2014, Caldwell and Smith singled out vulnerable investors to invest in bonds that had no more value than being collectible memorabilia – promising instead that they were worth millions.

Published on:

Here’s what you need to do now

Elder financial fraud continues to be a lucrative scheme in America, which is why seniors and their loved ones always need to keep their guard up. We have previously discussed how to spot fraud and what some financial institutions are doing to prevent it, and this piece serves as a guide on what to do about the fraud that has occurred.

Victims, their family members, or caregivers should follow these steps to help limit the damage:

Published on:

Individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s can be prime targets for financial predators

Unfortunately, we become more susceptible to financial scams from a wide range of offenders as we age. These include trusted advisors such as lawyers, accountants, and financial managers – as well as healthcare providers, caregivers, and even close family members.

Recent studies show that as our brains age, we become less able to detect deception and focus more on the potential for positive outcomes, especially when it comes to trusting people in our own social environment.

Published on:

This is one accusation comic book legend Stan Lee has made against his former manager

The latest proof that elder financial fraud could affect anyone comes courtesy of 95-year-old comic book legend Stan Lee. The creator of such notable characters as Spider-Man, Thor, and the Hulk recently filed a lawsuit against Jerardo Olivarez, his former manager and a former business associate of Lee’s daughter. In addition to fraud and misappropriation of his name and likeness, Lee has accused Olivarez of elder financial abuse.

Lee’s lawsuit – which was filed in April – calls Olivarez one of several “unscrupulous businessmen, sycophants and opportunists” who tried to take advantage of Lee after his wife Joan died in 2017. The suit alleges that shortly after Joan’s death, Olivarez coerced Lee into firing his long-time banker and lawyer and signing power of attorney over to him. He also convinced Lee to hire his own son as Lee’s attorney.

Published on:

A new program has launched with the goal of educating everyone about this problem

According to a 2017 survey conducted by the Cooperative Credit Union Association (CCUA), two-thirds of caregivers reported that they had an elderly family member who at one time or another was a target of some sort of fraud or scam. In addition, 28 percent of older people were victims of a scam.

The survey also revealed that only 4 percent of seniors had ever taken a financial literacy class. Overall, almost 40 percent of respondents believed their older relatives were “somewhat” or “not at all” financially literate.

Contact Information